SGA Hosts Focus Groups

SGA asks CAS the real questions

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is a STEM-based school which doesn’t allow for minute details of what may be wanted by students, such as minor details within course plans, to be had without students demanding and fighting for the change. To get things done, it starts with someone standing up for what they want and then finding people who want to join them. Whether it is fighting to rally attendance to start and keep a new club on campus alive, or fighting injustice in the world, it all stems from the student populace and what they collectively desire.

Sabrina Davis, the SGA representative for the College of Arts and Sciences (COAS or CAS), saw this fact and wanted to get the views of the students she works tirelessly to represent. She wanted to tackle the big topics: courses and degree specifics. She asked eleven open-ended questions with plenty of room to make comments:

1. How was UNIV? Were there assignments that helped you succeed in courses/in college? Were any assignments unnecessary?

2. Do you know what courses you can take in the future? Are there other electives you would like to take?

3. What class has benefitted you the most and why?

4. What classes do you think are not imperative to your degree program?

5. Are you able to get all the classes you need in four years?

6. What jobs/internships match some of the course material you have learned or will learn?

7. Are there any classes that are missing? Why?

8. Are there any other degree programs related to your degree program that [are] missing?

9. Are you prepared/doing well for capstone?

10. Are there enough faculty to support the degree program, and are they experts in the field?

11. Do you interact with SGA? What would you like to see from us?

Davis’s main job is to get student feedback in some way, shape, or form. “The College of Arts and Sciences is diverse in its programs, so the purpose of these focus groups was to get equally diverse feedback from every major within the college,” said Davis. She wants to “be able to give this information to respective committees and upper management so that the University can hear student concerns directly.” The goal of this would be to make beneficial changes within  CAS and its degree programs. Although this was the first focus group of its kind, Davis was “happy with the results and it seems like students within CAS are generally happy.” She wanted to let people know that “if there is anything that [someone] ever wants to say about CAS, good or bad, [they] can always come talk to [her]. SGA is here to serve the students and all feedback is good feedback.”

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is a STEM-based school which doesn’t allow for minute details of what may be wanted by students, such as minor details within course plans, to be had without students demanding and fighting for the change. To get things done, it starts with someone standing up for what they want and then finding people who want to join them. Whether it is fighting to rally attendance to start and keep a new club on campus alive, or fighting injustice in the world, it all stems from the student populace and what they collectively desire.

Sabrina Davis, the SGA representative for the College of Arts and Sciences (COAS or CAS), saw this fact and wanted to get the views of the students she works tirelessly to represent. She wanted to tackle the big topics: courses and degree specifics. She asked eleven open-ended questions with plenty of room to make comments:

1. How was UNIV? Were there assignments that helped you succeed in courses/in college? Were any assignments unnecessary?

2. Do you know what courses you can take in the future? Are there other electives you would like to take?

3. What class has benefitted you the most and why?

4. What classes do you think are not imperative to your degree program?

5. Are you able to get all the classes you need in four years?

6. What jobs/internships match some of the course material you have learned or will learn?

7. Are there any classes that are missing? Why?

8. Are there any other degree programs related to your degree program that [are] missing?

9. Are you prepared/doing well for capstone?

10. Are there enough faculty to support the degree program, and are they experts in the field?

11. Do you interact with SGA? What would you like to see from us?

Davis’s main job is to get student feedback in some way, shape, or form. “The College of Arts and Sciences is diverse in its programs, so the purpose of these focus groups was to get equally diverse feedback from every major within the college,” said Davis. She wants to “be able to give this information to respective committees and upper management so that the University can hear student concerns directly.” The goal of this would be to make beneficial changes within  CAS and its degree programs. Although this was the first focus group of its kind, Davis was “happy with the results and it seems like students within CAS are generally happy.” She wanted to let people know that “if there is anything that [someone] ever wants to say about CAS, good or bad, [they] can always come talk to [her]. SGA is here to serve the students and all feedback is good feedback.”

Freshman, Johnathan Wang, was one of the participants in the focus group and he, like many others in CAS degree programs, take a very individualistic path to get from point ‘A’ to point ‘B’. He is getting a Bachelor of Science in Aviation Business Administration along with a minor in Mandarin Chinese & Global Business while being ahead in his program from what he did prior to college. He participated because he wanted “to get [his] word out on how to improve the university’s resources in order to benefit the current student body as well as other incoming students in the future.” Wang took the focus group very seriously with high hopes of “others [taking his] input seriously,” in order to induce a change.

Freshman, Johnathan Wang, was one of the participants in the focus group and he, like many others in CAS degree programs, take a very individualistic path to get from point ‘A’ to point ‘B’. He is getting a Bachelor of Science in Aviation Business Administration along with a minor in Mandarin Chinese & Global Business while being ahead in his program from what he did prior to college. He participated because he wanted “to get [his] word out on how to improve the university’s resources in order to benefit the current student body as well as other incoming students in the future.” Wang took the focus group very seriously with high hopes of “others [taking his] input seriously,” in order to induce a change.

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